Classic movie site with rare images (no web grabs!), original ads, and behind-the-scenes photos, with informative and insightful commentary. We like to have fun with movies!
Archive and Links
grbrpix@aol.com
Search Index Here




Saturday, March 04, 2006




Animated Prestige


They say that Jack Warner was one day conducting some lot visitors past the animation building. Someone asked Jack about it, whereupon he waved a dismissive hand and replied, Oh, that’s where we make all those Mickey Mouse cartoons. I can believe that story, for based on an ongoing perusal of old trade magazines, it never did seem as though Warners really noticed their cartoon department, certainly not to the extent other companies did --- as witness these attractive ads for the 1945-46 release season. It goes without saying that RKO was proud of their relationship with Walt Disney. Those family-friendly features and shorts were quite an inducement for exhibitors when an RKO season contract was laid before them, and the studio could prop up a lot of their own weak sisters with the promise of Disney subjects to sweeten the deal. Notice how they’re linking cartoon characters with that massive crowd outside Radio City Music Hall. Prestige bookings on Broadway sure helped when it came time to sell product to the hinterlands. RKO salesmen would no doubt be waving this trade ad in front of every small exhibitor in their territory.


Metro took a lot of pride in their shorts department, and nothing made them glow like Tom and Jerry, which was far and away the biggest success story of any cartoon series the company had. Here they are clubbing exhibitors with the Academy Award for Quiet, Please. That cartoon was like every other T&J --- cash cows for MGM. Ponder these figures --- Quiet, Please, a 1945 release, had a negative cost of $27,198. Domestic rentals for its first release totaled $77,520. Since cartoons were happily a timeless product, Metro was able to bring it back in 1953 for another haul --- this time rentals were $67,018. Yet another re-issue, this time in 1963, enriched the company to the tune of $35,404. Add to that the eventual TV sales, non-theatrical --- yak yak --- and those registers still sing with DVD sales for Quiet, Please as part of the Tom and Jerry Immortal Uncut (whoops --- some of them are!) Classics Collection, or whatever it’s called. That’s a lot of coin for a little seven-minute cartoon to be mining over sixty-plus years, and a real tribute to the longevity of golden age animation. Even Jack Warner might finally be impressed.

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home

grbrpix@aol.com
  • December 2005
  • January 2006
  • February 2006
  • March 2006
  • April 2006
  • May 2006
  • June 2006
  • July 2006
  • August 2006
  • September 2006
  • October 2006
  • November 2006
  • December 2006
  • January 2007
  • February 2007
  • March 2007
  • April 2007
  • May 2007
  • June 2007
  • July 2007
  • August 2007
  • September 2007
  • October 2007
  • November 2007
  • December 2007
  • January 2008
  • February 2008
  • March 2008
  • April 2008
  • May 2008
  • June 2008
  • July 2008
  • August 2008
  • September 2008
  • October 2008
  • November 2008
  • December 2008
  • January 2009
  • February 2009
  • March 2009
  • April 2009
  • May 2009
  • June 2009
  • July 2009
  • August 2009
  • September 2009
  • October 2009
  • November 2009
  • December 2009
  • January 2010
  • February 2010
  • March 2010
  • April 2010
  • May 2010
  • June 2010
  • July 2010
  • August 2010
  • September 2010
  • October 2010
  • November 2010
  • December 2010
  • January 2011
  • February 2011
  • March 2011
  • April 2011
  • May 2011
  • June 2011
  • July 2011
  • August 2011
  • September 2011
  • October 2011
  • November 2011
  • December 2011
  • January 2012
  • February 2012
  • March 2012
  • April 2012
  • May 2012
  • June 2012
  • July 2012
  • August 2012
  • September 2012
  • October 2012
  • November 2012
  • December 2012
  • January 2013
  • February 2013
  • March 2013
  • April 2013
  • May 2013
  • June 2013
  • July 2013
  • August 2013
  • September 2013
  • October 2013
  • November 2013
  • December 2013
  • January 2014
  • February 2014
  • March 2014
  • April 2014
  • May 2014
  • June 2014
  • July 2014
  • August 2014
  • September 2014