Classic movie site with rare images (no web grabs!), original ads, and behind-the-scenes photos, with informative and insightful commentary. We like to have fun with movies!
Archive and Links
grbrpix@aol.com
Search Index Here




Sunday, July 02, 2006



Why Pick On Orson?

There were plenty of people wanting to take Orson Welles down a peg or two long before Hollywood and Citizen Kane. He was like the smartest kid in the class that everyone resented. "Little Orson Annie" and "Little Boy Boo" were just two of the monikers hung on him by press wags who thought OW too big for his britches. Here he’s getting radio's equivalent of schoolyard bullies that no doubt rode him unmercifully when Orson was growing up. Rudy Vallee, Bob Hope, and George Burns are giving OW the business over a new beard he’s sporting (one cowboy actor was said to have lately snipped off his tie with a knife and instructed Welles to "get out of town"). Yeah, I’m sure it was "all in fun", but there’s a nasty undercurrent to a lot of Welles’ press coverage from that period just after War Of The Worlds was broadcast. The public didn’t enjoy being played for fools by a broadcast hamster, let alone the media. A lot of this horseplay smells like payback of a faintly cruel sort, and I don't blame Orson for becoming somewhat imperious when real power finally came his way.


Does Paulette Goddard look a little bored in this shot? Well, at the time, Welles’ wife Virginia had just divorced him (shown here proferring the kiss-off), on the theory it’s no fun being married to a genius. Would Paulette concur? After all, she’d had her dish of that (remember Chaplin --- that supreme artist), and there’d be more to come (including Erich Maria Remarque). Chances are Orson won’t waste time pondering Shakespeare or Proust with the immediate post-Ghost Breakers
(this is April 1940) babelicious Paulette --- he’ll instead be plotting their eventual retreat back to private digs at the Garden Of Allah (wouldn’t you?). Meanwhile, back at the studio, fellow staffers get by on tuna sandwiches (if that) while OW digs into another Falstaffian repast (to paraphrase Preacher Harry Powell --- My, that steak looks yummy!).

1 Comments:

Blogger East Side said...

In his autobiography, Errol Flynn tells of Guinne "Big Boy" Williams' utter loathing for Welles. Big Boy once glued a beard onto a ham and sent it to Welles -- I believe Flynn referred to it as Guinn's "sign of disapproval."

In case I haven't told you in a while, this is a great site.

9:27 PM  

Post a Comment

<< Home

grbrpix@aol.com
  • December 2005
  • January 2006
  • February 2006
  • March 2006
  • April 2006
  • May 2006
  • June 2006
  • July 2006
  • August 2006
  • September 2006
  • October 2006
  • November 2006
  • December 2006
  • January 2007
  • February 2007
  • March 2007
  • April 2007
  • May 2007
  • June 2007
  • July 2007
  • August 2007
  • September 2007
  • October 2007
  • November 2007
  • December 2007
  • January 2008
  • February 2008
  • March 2008
  • April 2008
  • May 2008
  • June 2008
  • July 2008
  • August 2008
  • September 2008
  • October 2008
  • November 2008
  • December 2008
  • January 2009
  • February 2009
  • March 2009
  • April 2009
  • May 2009
  • June 2009
  • July 2009
  • August 2009
  • September 2009
  • October 2009
  • November 2009
  • December 2009
  • January 2010
  • February 2010
  • March 2010
  • April 2010
  • May 2010
  • June 2010
  • July 2010
  • August 2010
  • September 2010
  • October 2010
  • November 2010
  • December 2010
  • January 2011
  • February 2011
  • March 2011
  • April 2011
  • May 2011
  • June 2011
  • July 2011
  • August 2011
  • September 2011
  • October 2011
  • November 2011
  • December 2011
  • January 2012
  • February 2012
  • March 2012
  • April 2012
  • May 2012
  • June 2012
  • July 2012
  • August 2012
  • September 2012
  • October 2012
  • November 2012
  • December 2012
  • January 2013
  • February 2013
  • March 2013
  • April 2013
  • May 2013
  • June 2013
  • July 2013
  • August 2013
  • September 2013
  • October 2013
  • November 2013
  • December 2013
  • January 2014
  • February 2014
  • March 2014
  • April 2014
  • May 2014
  • June 2014
  • July 2014
  • August 2014
  • September 2014
  • October 2014