Classic movie site with rare images (no web grabs!), original ads, and behind-the-scenes photos, with informative and insightful commentary. We like to have fun with movies!
Archive and Links
grbrpix@aol.com
Search Index Here




Saturday, August 19, 2006



The Ann(e) Darling Mystery

The name Ann (or is it Anne?) Darling wouldn’t mean a thing to anyone were it not for the fact that she briefly tended sheep in Bride Of Frankenstein and had a moment’s encounter with Boris Karloff’s monster. Otherwise, her career at Universal came and went within a season, a fate not unknown to starlets whose initial promise never came to blossom. Could she have been the next Sidney Fox? Perhaps Ann(e) was another Carl Laemmle, Jr. protegee, and he lost interest. I was told years ago that she’d retired to, of all places, Hickory, North Carolina. A lost Bride Of Frankenstein cast member lived within driving distance! Having no address or even a current name, I made no attempt to trace her specific whereabouts. Perhaps a Yellow Pages search under shepherdesses would have revealed her, but not likely. The imdb claims she died on August 3, 1991 in Los Angeles. Well, they’ve made mistakes before. Assuming she were alive, Darling would be 91. I’d like to think she’s still in Hickory, just waiting for someone like me to rediscover her so she could tell all about that day she worked with Boris Karloff.


When I Google searched Ann (and Anne) Darling, I got nowhere. One link explained how to remove skin tags from your dog’s eyelid. Another took me to a specimen of erotic fiction entitled The Reluctant Father Figure, a story told in nine parts which looked to run in excess of 60,000 words. I’d like to reveal the entire saga of Ann Darling, particularly the Whatever Happened To… part (maybe one of you can), but for the time being, these images will have to do. The step-by-step process with Jack Pierce is dated September 1934. Refreshing to see Jack applying something other than yak hair and bolts to a subject’s face. I’d gone years thinking he just made up monsters, but here’s proof that Pierce could deliver on the glamour treatment when he set his mind to it. Roman Freulich, Universal’s photographer in residence, made the portrait. Finally, we have Ann Darling spotting Boris Karloff from a soundstage hilltop in Bride Of Frankenstein.

1 Comments:

Anonymous Frank said...

John,

Here's a reference to Anne I found on a book site that might be of interest:

WOMEN IN HORROR FILMS, 1930s
By Gregory William Mank
Softbound - 403 Pages
Book/Special Creepy Price - $25

They had more in common than just a scream, whether they faced Dracula, Frankenstein's Monster, the Mummy, Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hyde, King Kong, the Wolf Man, or any of the other legendary Hollywood monsters. Some were even monsters themselves, such as Elsa Lanchester as the Bride, and Gloria Holden as Dracula's Daughter. And while evading the Strangler of the Swamp , former Miss America Rosemary La Planche is allowed to rescue her leading man. This book provides details about the lives and careers of 21 of these cinematic leading ladies, femmes fatales, monsters, and misfits, putting into perspective their contributions to the films and folklore of Hollywood terror. In a previously unpublished account, Bride of Frankenstein 's Anne Darling remembers when, at age 17, she was humiliated on-set by director James Whale over the color of her underwear. Filled with anecdotes and recollections, many of the entries are based on original interviews, and there are numerous old photographs and movie stills.

8:05 AM  

Post a Comment

<< Home

grbrpix@aol.com
  • December 2005
  • January 2006
  • February 2006
  • March 2006
  • April 2006
  • May 2006
  • June 2006
  • July 2006
  • August 2006
  • September 2006
  • October 2006
  • November 2006
  • December 2006
  • January 2007
  • February 2007
  • March 2007
  • April 2007
  • May 2007
  • June 2007
  • July 2007
  • August 2007
  • September 2007
  • October 2007
  • November 2007
  • December 2007
  • January 2008
  • February 2008
  • March 2008
  • April 2008
  • May 2008
  • June 2008
  • July 2008
  • August 2008
  • September 2008
  • October 2008
  • November 2008
  • December 2008
  • January 2009
  • February 2009
  • March 2009
  • April 2009
  • May 2009
  • June 2009
  • July 2009
  • August 2009
  • September 2009
  • October 2009
  • November 2009
  • December 2009
  • January 2010
  • February 2010
  • March 2010
  • April 2010
  • May 2010
  • June 2010
  • July 2010
  • August 2010
  • September 2010
  • October 2010
  • November 2010
  • December 2010
  • January 2011
  • February 2011
  • March 2011
  • April 2011
  • May 2011
  • June 2011
  • July 2011
  • August 2011
  • September 2011
  • October 2011
  • November 2011
  • December 2011
  • January 2012
  • February 2012
  • March 2012
  • April 2012
  • May 2012
  • June 2012
  • July 2012
  • August 2012
  • September 2012
  • October 2012
  • November 2012
  • December 2012
  • January 2013
  • February 2013
  • March 2013
  • April 2013
  • May 2013
  • June 2013
  • July 2013
  • August 2013
  • September 2013
  • October 2013
  • November 2013
  • December 2013
  • January 2014
  • February 2014
  • March 2014
  • April 2014
  • May 2014
  • June 2014
  • July 2014
  • August 2014
  • September 2014
  • October 2014
  • November 2014
  • December 2014
  • January 2015
  • February 2015
  • March 2015
  • April 2015
  • May 2015
  • June 2015
  • July 2015
  • August 2015
  • September 2015
  • October 2015
  • November 2015
  • December 2015
  • January 2016
  • February 2016
  • March 2016
  • April 2016
  • May 2016
  • June 2016
  • July 2016
  • August 2016
  • September 2016
  • October 2016
  • November 2016
  • December 2016