Classic movie site with rare images (no web grabs!), original ads, and behind-the-scenes photos, with informative and insightful commentary. We like to have fun with movies!
Archive and Links
grbrpix@aol.com
Search Index Here




Tuesday, June 18, 2013


Pressbook Look --- State's Attorney (1932)

Where Pressbook Filing Takes a Break That Turns Into Another Post ...

Jack Barrymore in transition. He was still the romance leading man, with added patina of being a most celebrated of actors. JB was something special to sell, as opposed to chisel-faces in sock and smooch mode. State's Attorney was visited in a previous Watch List, thus delve here to selling aspect. Here was RKO spreading word of His (as in JB) First Great Modern American Role. Was it actually? There'd been lots of stateside comedies for Barrymore's start in movies, but those were years before and silent. Close look at past hits was reminder that even contemporary-set Barrymores tended to take place in foreign locales: Grand Hotel, Arsene Lupin, others. State's Attorney was modern, and thoroughly American, for stripping veils off legal chicanery, JB attacking juries as he would a first night audience.


The way RKO merchandising tags "Out of the Glamorous Past of Painted Make-Up and Costume Romance" (above) has an almost Good Riddance subtext. Had Jack put paid to puffed sleeves and past-set folderol? His status as the Screen's Greatest Lover was intact, but for how much longer? I like the "news" plant about RKO secretaries ducking work to watch him emote. The article says they skipped lunch to hurry over to the State's Attorney set "and watch the great screen lover in action." Could clerical help so readily enter a sound stage where they otherwise had no business merely to "watch"? If so, it must have been whales of fun being an RKO employee, though I'd have been hard put  choosing between State's Attorney's set and blueprints being drawn for King Kong.

1 Comments:

Blogger John McElwee said...

Dan Mercer shares some thoughts about John Barrymore and "State's Attorney":


"Rolled off the front pages, " indeed, and with all the subtlety and depth you'd expect from any five star edition. Not that "State's Attorney" is all that bad. Actually, it's quite entertaining, thanks to a powerful and incisive Barrymore performance and the eye-candy of Helen Twelvetrees, but what melodramatic claptrap it is. It's the sort of thing Warren William would be doing for Warner Bros. and probably a reason why he was compared to Barrymore then. I like Warren William a lot, but pulling off a picture like "The Mouthpiece" is one thing, doing a "Counselor at Law," is something else. It's only when a piece of music calls for the high notes that the truly great have an opportunity to distance themselves from the lounge singers. The one really regrettable aspect of "State's Attorney" is that we're only too aware of what little time Barrymore had left. His will and talent held at abeyance the ravages of a dissipating life style, but not for much longer. This was a lost opportunity.



Daniel Mercer

1:47 PM  

Post a Comment

<< Home

grbrpix@aol.com
  • December 2005
  • January 2006
  • February 2006
  • March 2006
  • April 2006
  • May 2006
  • June 2006
  • July 2006
  • August 2006
  • September 2006
  • October 2006
  • November 2006
  • December 2006
  • January 2007
  • February 2007
  • March 2007
  • April 2007
  • May 2007
  • June 2007
  • July 2007
  • August 2007
  • September 2007
  • October 2007
  • November 2007
  • December 2007
  • January 2008
  • February 2008
  • March 2008
  • April 2008
  • May 2008
  • June 2008
  • July 2008
  • August 2008
  • September 2008
  • October 2008
  • November 2008
  • December 2008
  • January 2009
  • February 2009
  • March 2009
  • April 2009
  • May 2009
  • June 2009
  • July 2009
  • August 2009
  • September 2009
  • October 2009
  • November 2009
  • December 2009
  • January 2010
  • February 2010
  • March 2010
  • April 2010
  • May 2010
  • June 2010
  • July 2010
  • August 2010
  • September 2010
  • October 2010
  • November 2010
  • December 2010
  • January 2011
  • February 2011
  • March 2011
  • April 2011
  • May 2011
  • June 2011
  • July 2011
  • August 2011
  • September 2011
  • October 2011
  • November 2011
  • December 2011
  • January 2012
  • February 2012
  • March 2012
  • April 2012
  • May 2012
  • June 2012
  • July 2012
  • August 2012
  • September 2012
  • October 2012
  • November 2012
  • December 2012
  • January 2013
  • February 2013
  • March 2013
  • April 2013
  • May 2013
  • June 2013
  • July 2013
  • August 2013
  • September 2013
  • October 2013
  • November 2013
  • December 2013
  • January 2014
  • February 2014
  • March 2014
  • April 2014
  • May 2014
  • June 2014
  • July 2014
  • August 2014
  • September 2014
  • October 2014
  • November 2014
  • December 2014
  • January 2015
  • February 2015
  • March 2015
  • April 2015
  • May 2015
  • June 2015
  • July 2015
  • August 2015
  • September 2015
  • October 2015
  • November 2015
  • December 2015
  • January 2016
  • February 2016
  • March 2016
  • April 2016
  • May 2016
  • June 2016
  • July 2016
  • August 2016
  • September 2016
  • October 2016
  • November 2016
  • December 2016