Classic movie site with rare images (no web grabs!), original ads, and behind-the-scenes photos, with informative and insightful commentary. We like to have fun with movies!
Archive and Links
grbrpix@aol.com
Search Index Here




Friday, October 18, 2013

Raft On A Rampage!


GR Combs LA For Filmland Slayer in Nocturne (1946)

Lone cop George Raft is dealt off the force for questioning a settled suicide. Raft may not have lit personality fires, but was ideal for dogged investigating and occasional temper loss, his a lulling invite to half-sleep as we await expected outcome. A novelty here is George still living with Mom and briefing her as to progress over bacon/eggs. There's also suspicion's path leading to RKO stages where Sinbad The Sailor is being made, a highlight by itself worth the sit. Good talent was involved: producing Joan Harrison of Hitchcock association, scenarist Jonathan Latimer who'd later pen The Big Clock, and story basis the work of Rowland Brown, who had crime-written and directed himself. As in happiest aspect of noir, Nocturne gets onto streets of LA with Raft amongst civilians who don't recognize him for brief shots they share. Moody and dark-lit sets were an RKO signature, effective even if they were meant to conceal limit of spending (Nocturne's negative cost: $694K). Worldwide rentals of two million handed RKO one of its bigger profits of the year, basis for the firm to go on Raft-ing. His earlier turndowns of High Sierra and The Maltese Falcon was artistic blundering for sure, but George knew where money was (then how come him to die virtually broke?).

3 Comments:

Blogger Reg Hartt said...

Everyone should die broke. Then the people around our death bed are there for love of us not for love of the money they will get when we breathe our last.

In Guy Endore's KING OF PARIS on the last day of his life as the maid pulled off the trousers of Alexandre Dumas Pere a gold Napoleon and a few coins fells from the pockets to the floor causing the old man to laugh.

"What's so funny,Poppa?" said Dumas Fils.

"I came to Paris with one gold Napoleon and a few coins. I am leaving Paris with one gold Napoleon and a few coins. All of my life people have been telling me I can't handle my money. Well,I had a grand time and it did not cost me a cent," laughed the author of THE THREE MUSKETEERS and THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO.

Yes, and he made the world richer for his passing. Ditto George Raft.

When our life is spent our money should be as well.

8:31 AM  
Blogger rnigma said...

Jonathan Latimer had written the "Bill Crane" mystery books, about a perpetually inebriated detective (filmed at Universal with, if I recall, Preston Foster). He would go on to write for TV, including a couple of the better "Perry Mason" episodes (including "Case of the Deadly Verdict," wherein Mason lost a case), and some "Columbo"s.

11:13 PM  
Blogger Dave G said...

I like Nocturne, but always come away thinking that it would be a better film with someone else (Dick Powell?) in the lead. Raft's so emotionally flat that I just don't buy his character.

4:57 AM  

Post a Comment

<< Home

grbrpix@aol.com
  • December 2005
  • January 2006
  • February 2006
  • March 2006
  • April 2006
  • May 2006
  • June 2006
  • July 2006
  • August 2006
  • September 2006
  • October 2006
  • November 2006
  • December 2006
  • January 2007
  • February 2007
  • March 2007
  • April 2007
  • May 2007
  • June 2007
  • July 2007
  • August 2007
  • September 2007
  • October 2007
  • November 2007
  • December 2007
  • January 2008
  • February 2008
  • March 2008
  • April 2008
  • May 2008
  • June 2008
  • July 2008
  • August 2008
  • September 2008
  • October 2008
  • November 2008
  • December 2008
  • January 2009
  • February 2009
  • March 2009
  • April 2009
  • May 2009
  • June 2009
  • July 2009
  • August 2009
  • September 2009
  • October 2009
  • November 2009
  • December 2009
  • January 2010
  • February 2010
  • March 2010
  • April 2010
  • May 2010
  • June 2010
  • July 2010
  • August 2010
  • September 2010
  • October 2010
  • November 2010
  • December 2010
  • January 2011
  • February 2011
  • March 2011
  • April 2011
  • May 2011
  • June 2011
  • July 2011
  • August 2011
  • September 2011
  • October 2011
  • November 2011
  • December 2011
  • January 2012
  • February 2012
  • March 2012
  • April 2012
  • May 2012
  • June 2012
  • July 2012
  • August 2012
  • September 2012
  • October 2012
  • November 2012
  • December 2012
  • January 2013
  • February 2013
  • March 2013
  • April 2013
  • May 2013
  • June 2013
  • July 2013
  • August 2013
  • September 2013
  • October 2013
  • November 2013
  • December 2013
  • January 2014
  • February 2014
  • March 2014
  • April 2014
  • May 2014
  • June 2014
  • July 2014
  • August 2014
  • September 2014
  • October 2014
  • November 2014
  • December 2014
  • January 2015
  • February 2015
  • March 2015
  • April 2015
  • May 2015
  • June 2015
  • July 2015
  • August 2015
  • September 2015
  • October 2015
  • November 2015
  • December 2015
  • January 2016
  • February 2016
  • March 2016
  • April 2016
  • May 2016
  • June 2016
  • July 2016
  • August 2016
  • September 2016
  • October 2016
  • November 2016
  • December 2016