Classic movie site with rare images (no web grabs!), original ads, and behind-the-scenes photos, with informative and insightful commentary. We like to have fun with movies!
Archive and Links
grbrpix@aol.com
Search Index Here




Sunday, March 02, 2014

Jazz-Mad Youth At Slow Tempo


The 20's Roaring Its Last in Dance Hall (1929)

Woeful in ways too many associate with earliest talkers, the fact much of Dance Hall plays out of sync on TCM further grist for tarred brush the unknowing apply to oldies. What this needs is audio tweak if not full restoration. Who'll step up with cash? There's the rub, of course, Dance Hall being miles short of importance to justify outlay, whatever our level of interest in late 20's artifacts. There is interest per lifestyle it depicts, club environ a likely mirror of what towns large and small had to pass leisure time of jazz-mad youth. Again there are dance contests to breathe life into workaday grind, acreage plowed by year-later Dancing Sweeties and undoubted dozens more I've not seen. Arthur Lake is a gelded boy lead, comforting to mothers watching perhaps, but a grind for us now. How could he credibly get any girl, let alone looker Olive Borden?, but scripts had ways of making improbables come true, thus score one for Arthur, a hapless Dagwood here in all but name. Dance Hall was made when a nickel was real money people argued over, which makes sense considering you could buy a whole soda or half a movie ticket with it.

3 Comments:

Blogger John McElwee said...

Dan Mercer sees something amiss in the "Dance Hall" one-sheet ...


"Dance Hall" played on TCM out of synch? Possibly they were trying to recreate an authentic talkie experience. The poster seems a little out of synch, too, with Arthur Lake a whole lot more dynamic and Olive Borden a whole lot less cute than they would have been in the film.

Daniel Mercer

5:54 AM  
Blogger Scott MacGillivray said...

I wonder if the film was out of synch or the broadcast was out of sync. I've seen a few digital presentations where the picture and sound don't match. Did Mr. Osborne or Mr. Mankiewicz introduce it, and was he in synch?

2:03 PM  
Blogger aldi said...

On the Nitrateville boards someone mentions taping the movie in 1989 from a TV showing on the local ABC affiliate which ran the Movietime USA package late at night. "This was a better-than-average print, with the original Radio Pictures logo intact. Right away while viewing my tape I noticed the badly out-of-sync sound ....... "

Many theories discussed there as to the poor synching, the chief one being that some parts of the original that showed in theatres was dubbed over for some reason.

I love this movie. The presence of Joseph Cawthorn and the lovely Helen Kaiser is a big plus for me. She only appeared in 3 movies, the other 2 being Rio Rita and Tanned Legs, both 1929 but she made a real impression on me in Rita as Bert Wheeler's character's first wife.

9:59 PM  

Post a Comment

<< Home

grbrpix@aol.com
  • December 2005
  • January 2006
  • February 2006
  • March 2006
  • April 2006
  • May 2006
  • June 2006
  • July 2006
  • August 2006
  • September 2006
  • October 2006
  • November 2006
  • December 2006
  • January 2007
  • February 2007
  • March 2007
  • April 2007
  • May 2007
  • June 2007
  • July 2007
  • August 2007
  • September 2007
  • October 2007
  • November 2007
  • December 2007
  • January 2008
  • February 2008
  • March 2008
  • April 2008
  • May 2008
  • June 2008
  • July 2008
  • August 2008
  • September 2008
  • October 2008
  • November 2008
  • December 2008
  • January 2009
  • February 2009
  • March 2009
  • April 2009
  • May 2009
  • June 2009
  • July 2009
  • August 2009
  • September 2009
  • October 2009
  • November 2009
  • December 2009
  • January 2010
  • February 2010
  • March 2010
  • April 2010
  • May 2010
  • June 2010
  • July 2010
  • August 2010
  • September 2010
  • October 2010
  • November 2010
  • December 2010
  • January 2011
  • February 2011
  • March 2011
  • April 2011
  • May 2011
  • June 2011
  • July 2011
  • August 2011
  • September 2011
  • October 2011
  • November 2011
  • December 2011
  • January 2012
  • February 2012
  • March 2012
  • April 2012
  • May 2012
  • June 2012
  • July 2012
  • August 2012
  • September 2012
  • October 2012
  • November 2012
  • December 2012
  • January 2013
  • February 2013
  • March 2013
  • April 2013
  • May 2013
  • June 2013
  • July 2013
  • August 2013
  • September 2013
  • October 2013
  • November 2013
  • December 2013
  • January 2014
  • February 2014
  • March 2014
  • April 2014
  • May 2014
  • June 2014
  • July 2014
  • August 2014
  • September 2014
  • October 2014
  • November 2014
  • December 2014
  • January 2015
  • February 2015
  • March 2015
  • April 2015
  • May 2015
  • June 2015
  • July 2015
  • August 2015
  • September 2015
  • October 2015
  • November 2015
  • December 2015
  • January 2016
  • February 2016
  • March 2016
  • April 2016
  • May 2016
  • June 2016
  • July 2016
  • August 2016
  • September 2016