Classic movie site with rare images (no web grabs!), original ads, and behind-the-scenes photos, with informative and insightful commentary. We like to have fun with movies!
Archive and Links
grbrpix@aol.com
Search Index Here




Tuesday, May 06, 2014

"The Voice" Makes Metro Music


Sinatra Serenades Grayson in It Happened In Brooklyn (1947)

Where this gets most magical is a scene early on when Frank Sinatra arrives to home turf of Brooklyn and salutes the fabled bridge with song, him and the location before us with Manhattan skyscrapers for backdrop. It's dazzling appetizer for when MGM would return with Sinatra and Technicolor cameras to do On The Town three years later. Frank is here a gentle presence swallowed by uniform and timid of girls as would be the case until shark-suit and hipster days that would come. His was image change reminiscent of Dick Powell's, only Frank's was less calculation than circumstance of offscreen behavior that made his shy-guy persona impossible to sustain. Brooklyn finds him pal'ed up with Peter Lawford, who'd become a whipping boy to Sinatra the entertainment force, but that was years off and into their Rat Pack era.


Lawford plays reticent here as well; you don't expect either of the two to get girls, let alone trilling Kathryn Grayson as music teacher to tenement kids among whom, natch, is a musical genius. Sinatra as counsel and good influence to youth is advanced from start he'd made with The House I Live In, an RKO short wherein he preached tolerance and got probably his best-ever press for doing so. Frank still was boyish himself and plays off co-players appreciatively, most of all Jimmy Durante, their together-songs a highlight of It Happened In Brooklyn. But Frank was said to have feuded with Durante, and disobedient to Metro bosses, who were known to spank hard for offenses less than his. Stronger and more lasting placement in musicals were scotched for Sinatra's willful ways, rescue when he later needed it not forthcoming because of ill will he left at Culver.


MGM had made success enough of tuners to add units devoted to them; Brooklyn's was headed by Jack Cummings, who along with Joe Pasternak, produced musicals generally a tier down from Arthur Freed's. Most from Cummings and Pasternak missed classic status, but cost less and often grossed better than the Freeds. It Happened In Brooklyn, however, lost money. Negative cost of $1.8 million was met with the same amount in domestic rentals, and foreign that was needed to go into profit came to mere $796K, an outcome that might have been expected, as what did those markets care about what happened in Brooklyn? Similar indifference was possibly felt in America's heartland, for that matter. It Happened In Brooklyn is available on DVD, and plays HD on Warner Instant.

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home

grbrpix@aol.com
  • December 2005
  • January 2006
  • February 2006
  • March 2006
  • April 2006
  • May 2006
  • June 2006
  • July 2006
  • August 2006
  • September 2006
  • October 2006
  • November 2006
  • December 2006
  • January 2007
  • February 2007
  • March 2007
  • April 2007
  • May 2007
  • June 2007
  • July 2007
  • August 2007
  • September 2007
  • October 2007
  • November 2007
  • December 2007
  • January 2008
  • February 2008
  • March 2008
  • April 2008
  • May 2008
  • June 2008
  • July 2008
  • August 2008
  • September 2008
  • October 2008
  • November 2008
  • December 2008
  • January 2009
  • February 2009
  • March 2009
  • April 2009
  • May 2009
  • June 2009
  • July 2009
  • August 2009
  • September 2009
  • October 2009
  • November 2009
  • December 2009
  • January 2010
  • February 2010
  • March 2010
  • April 2010
  • May 2010
  • June 2010
  • July 2010
  • August 2010
  • September 2010
  • October 2010
  • November 2010
  • December 2010
  • January 2011
  • February 2011
  • March 2011
  • April 2011
  • May 2011
  • June 2011
  • July 2011
  • August 2011
  • September 2011
  • October 2011
  • November 2011
  • December 2011
  • January 2012
  • February 2012
  • March 2012
  • April 2012
  • May 2012
  • June 2012
  • July 2012
  • August 2012
  • September 2012
  • October 2012
  • November 2012
  • December 2012
  • January 2013
  • February 2013
  • March 2013
  • April 2013
  • May 2013
  • June 2013
  • July 2013
  • August 2013
  • September 2013
  • October 2013
  • November 2013
  • December 2013
  • January 2014
  • February 2014
  • March 2014
  • April 2014
  • May 2014
  • June 2014
  • July 2014
  • August 2014
  • September 2014
  • October 2014
  • November 2014
  • December 2014
  • January 2015
  • February 2015
  • March 2015
  • April 2015
  • May 2015
  • June 2015
  • July 2015
  • August 2015
  • September 2015
  • October 2015
  • November 2015
  • December 2015
  • January 2016
  • February 2016
  • March 2016
  • April 2016
  • May 2016
  • June 2016
  • July 2016
  • August 2016
  • September 2016