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Saturday, July 19, 2014

Enter Eddie Dean to Postwar Westerns


Eddie and A Horse Called Copper in The Westward Trail (1948)

Eddie Dean and steed rout schemes to mine silver at expense of homesteaders. Less of same was invested by PRC on beginner lead Dean's behalf. How could he rise to cowboy top on such meager outlay of coin? Series westerns were barn-bound by the late forties, what with specter of TV on horizons. Still, there'd be effort at renewing brands --- Lash LaRue, Rex Allen, Jimmy Wakely --- but as J.J. Hunsecker once said, You're dead son, go get yourself buried. What's ignored about Dean is fact he was a darn good songwriter in addition to other gifts, It's Courtin' Time his serenade to lead lady Phyllis Planchard (Westward was one of only two credited feature roles she had). Eddie did twenty westerns for PRC, according to B-west Bible The Hollywood Corral, a few of these in Cinecolor, then focused on music. His westerns show up from time to time on Retroplex in a best quality I've seen for PD floor sweepings.

4 Comments:

Blogger Kevin K. said...

It took a long time, but for the first time since you've started blogging, you've written about someone I've never heard of. I'm not sure if congratulations are called for...

10:28 AM  
Blogger Mike Cline said...

Eddie later appeared as a cop in several episodes of THE BEVERLY HILLBILLES.

1:45 PM  
Blogger William Ferry said...

I'm reminded of the review quoted in Don Miller's HOLLYWOOD CORRAL: "Eddie Dean's latest is in black and white, rather than color. But it's no improvement - you can still see him".

2:00 PM  
Blogger Scott MacGillivray said...

Cinecolor was the drawing card when Eddie Dean made his bow as a cowboy star in 1945 -- exhibitors saw color westerns as a refreshing change of pace, and PRC not only showcased Eddie Dean but also featured player Al LaRue. LaRue was of course given his own series.

PRC was certainly creative in promoting the Eddie Deans. I remember a scene in GAS HOUSE KIDS GO WEST where 19-year-old Alfalfa Switzer, channeling Leo Gorcey as best he could, clambered into a saddle and said, if I remember correctly, "I can ride a horse as good as Eddie Dean!"

3:46 PM  

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