Classic movie site with rare images (no web grabs!), original ads, and behind-the-scenes photos, with informative and insightful commentary. We like to have fun with movies!
Archive and Links
grbrpix@aol.com
Search Index Here




Saturday, March 17, 2018

RKO Sets The Price For Love


Ann Harding Claims The Right To Romance (1933)

Ann Harding was most grounded of precode women, hers a line in reasoned calm. Being thirty, then past it, lent characters sobriety welcome to the genre. Censorship choked life out of sex topic that was focal to Harding, Kay Francis, Chatterton, others who knew life's score, but could no longer express it on truth terms. Harding as most subdued of the lot meant she'd be early forgot. That plus lack of a signature role (The Animal Kingdom the closest, but out of circulation till long after her 1981 death). Harding underplayed and so seems modern today. When she beds down, it's less illicit than application of common sense. Convey of intelligence put Harding to enact of professional women, on this occasion a plastic surgeon who "smells of ether" and knows to get a man means playing the "giddy female." Shore vacation puts her in crosshair of idler rich Robert Young, whom she marries in haste to despair of medico Nils Asther, him loving from afar. This may crash on formula shoals but for brief spend (67 minutes) that most any precode can sustain (backdrops and fashion to look at if nothing else).



Search for beauty angle is well observed, women hoping facelifts will pave path to romance. Harding's surgeon can evidently fix any mishap or mutilation --- were real-life docs as proficient in 1933? Certainly there were stars of the era who sought cosmetic cure for age, few of them getting result so satisfactory as Dr. Harding delivers here. I'm wondering just when face work became panacea it's considered today. Based on horrors we still see emerge from operation tables (check any week's Enquirer), true success at such effort may still be in offing. The Right To Romance was made during Merian C. Cooper watch, his notion to increase RKO volume as offset for losses, modern-set stories done cheap and by bundles. Industry joke was same bundles out of RKO being product of unwed motherhood in one after another sex mellers spat out by the company. Primary risk to contract stars like Harding or Constance Bennett was overexposure or sameness of vehicles. Their party had to end whatever disposition of the Code. Among six RKO titles owned by Merian C. Cooper and tied up for years, The Right To Romance was revived in 2006 by TCM (another with Ann Harding in that group: Double Harness).

1 Comments:

Blogger Kevin K. said...

You're spot-on regarding your description of Ann Harding's acting style. Unlike some of her contemporaries -- Bette Davis or Joan Crawford -- it's impossible to imitate her because there's no theatrics. She just... is.

11:19 AM  

Post a Comment

<< Home

grbrpix@aol.com
  • December 2005
  • January 2006
  • February 2006
  • March 2006
  • April 2006
  • May 2006
  • June 2006
  • July 2006
  • August 2006
  • September 2006
  • October 2006
  • November 2006
  • December 2006
  • January 2007
  • February 2007
  • March 2007
  • April 2007
  • May 2007
  • June 2007
  • July 2007
  • August 2007
  • September 2007
  • October 2007
  • November 2007
  • December 2007
  • January 2008
  • February 2008
  • March 2008
  • April 2008
  • May 2008
  • June 2008
  • July 2008
  • August 2008
  • September 2008
  • October 2008
  • November 2008
  • December 2008
  • January 2009
  • February 2009
  • March 2009
  • April 2009
  • May 2009
  • June 2009
  • July 2009
  • August 2009
  • September 2009
  • October 2009
  • November 2009
  • December 2009
  • January 2010
  • February 2010
  • March 2010
  • April 2010
  • May 2010
  • June 2010
  • July 2010
  • August 2010
  • September 2010
  • October 2010
  • November 2010
  • December 2010
  • January 2011
  • February 2011
  • March 2011
  • April 2011
  • May 2011
  • June 2011
  • July 2011
  • August 2011
  • September 2011
  • October 2011
  • November 2011
  • December 2011
  • January 2012
  • February 2012
  • March 2012
  • April 2012
  • May 2012
  • June 2012
  • July 2012
  • August 2012
  • September 2012
  • October 2012
  • November 2012
  • December 2012
  • January 2013
  • February 2013
  • March 2013
  • April 2013
  • May 2013
  • June 2013
  • July 2013
  • August 2013
  • September 2013
  • October 2013
  • November 2013
  • December 2013
  • January 2014
  • February 2014
  • March 2014
  • April 2014
  • May 2014
  • June 2014
  • July 2014
  • August 2014
  • September 2014
  • October 2014
  • November 2014
  • December 2014
  • January 2015
  • February 2015
  • March 2015
  • April 2015
  • May 2015
  • June 2015
  • July 2015
  • August 2015
  • September 2015
  • October 2015
  • November 2015
  • December 2015
  • January 2016
  • February 2016
  • March 2016
  • April 2016
  • May 2016
  • June 2016
  • July 2016
  • August 2016
  • September 2016
  • October 2016
  • November 2016
  • December 2016
  • January 2017
  • February 2017
  • March 2017
  • April 2017
  • May 2017
  • June 2017
  • July 2017
  • August 2017
  • September 2017
  • October 2017
  • November 2017
  • December 2017
  • January 2018
  • February 2018
  • March 2018
  • April 2018
  • May 2018
  • June 2018
  • July 2018
  • August 2018
  • September 2018
  • October 2018