Classic movie site with rare images, original ads, and behind-the-scenes photos, with informative and insightful commentary. We like to have fun with movies!
Archive and Links
grbrpix@aol.com
Search Index Here




Friday, March 29, 2019

60's Slant On War-Making


Brit-Lensed The War Lover (1962) With Yank Stars

Made at Shepperton for Columbia release, this was WWII revisited with players too young to have participated in the actual conflict, that in itself a fresh approach after years of grizzled lead men suiting up for battle. Steve McQueen is a lone wolf pilot, Robert Wagner his second at the stick, and as with fly-boys back to Ty Power, Cagney, et al, it's McQueen snaking Wagner's girl, departure from cliché being SQ the sociopath everyone sees for what he is, Steve to his credit not softening the character to be more likeable. It was probably the rising star's best performance to that point, even as The War Lover made few waves otherwise. Wagner said in memoirs that McQueen was suspicious of everyone and protective of star standing. Most of action is on the ground, combat staged in boudoirs rather than sky. That last could be spelled out clearer as the Code loosened grip. A larger problem was networks having to shave content of The War Lover and like-others in conformance with standard still enforced on airwaves, movies by now making hasty way to tube play. The War Lover had a 1/20/66 debut on CBS, where a by far larger audience saw it than had paid admission in 1962.

5 Comments:

Blogger Donald Benson said...

Did studios began providing alterations for television (dubbed or reshot scenes to remove epithets, put more clothing on a girl, etc.), or were networks left to their own devices?

When I was a kid, the talk of the schoolyard was a television showing of "Goldfinger" with Honor Blackman's character identified as "(silence) Galore". Hard to imagine the Bond people reshooting for American television, but for lower-cost product I can imagine the studios wanting to smooth the way for a quick television sale.

3:43 AM  
Blogger John McElwee said...

Richard M. Roberts checks in via e-mail:


John,

Almost better than THE WAR LOVER is Martin Caidin's book EVERYTHING BUT THE FLAK, which chronicles the story behind the restoration, refurbishing, and flying across the U.S., then the Atlantic, of three B-17's for use in the shooting of the film, a total adventure itself, in which Caidin went along for the ride, and my old stunt pilot friend Don Hackett flew one of the planes, as well as working on the film itself. That story might have made an even better movie.


Say, I hear a rumor that BLogger is actually going to wipe out it's blogs, is Greenbriar in any danger of disappearing?

RICHARD

John replies: The rumor is new to me, but obviously a concern. I Google'd the matter and found this link:

https://www.digitalinformationworld.com/2018/11/not-closing-blogger-service-comments-google.html

... but it's from November and who knows what may have developed since. I probably should move Greenbriar over to something more secure, but lack tech skills to do so. Anyone got suggestions?

Should Greenbriar go poof, I would probably follow Sherlock Holmes' example, retire to Sussex, and keep bees.

7:18 AM  
Blogger Reg Hartt said...

You'd make a fine beekeeper. Lord knows, the bees need keeping. We should all keep bees.

7:28 AM  
Blogger Tommie Hicks said...

I would surely despair your departure, John.

1:29 PM  
Blogger John McElwee said...

Griff considers movies revised to meet network broadcast standards:


Dear John:

Love Reg Hartt (and I do worry about the plight of the bees), but the only bees we want you to tend are b-movies -- all movies, for that matter. Do not go gentle into that good night. Heck, do not go anywhere.

Donald Benson brings up a good point -- how did Columbia and CBS deal with the problems of broadcasting the today-mild but back-in-the-day-salacious stuff in WAR LOVER? There are at least two scenes in the movie that probably just had to go, per standards of '66. I can't imagine that CBS aired the film without cuts. [I wonder whether Columbia sneaked stuff back into the film for syndication.]

I am reminded for some reason of Frank and Eleanor Perry's dilemma in preparing a TV print for NBC of 1970's DIARY OF A MAD HOUSEWIFE. There was so much immediately broadcast-censorable material, stuff that could never have aired, in the picture, the Perrys had to script and shoot additional "cover" scenes during production in order to make the narrative of a TV version work (and also run long enough for a two-hour NBC time slot). By 1970, Universal gave very specific instructions to its producers, "creative rights" and mature content notwithstanding: a broadcast-acceptable version had to be assembled for possible network sale and eventual syndication. HOUSEWIFE, a critical and commercial success, did eventually receive two network plays on NBC. A few of those additional scenes shot for the TV version were, well, kind of strange, but they had some bite and distinction and had clearly been scripted by Eleanor Perry.

Regards,
-- Griff

2:10 PM  

Post a Comment

<< Home

grbrpix@aol.com
  • December 2005
  • January 2006
  • February 2006
  • March 2006
  • April 2006
  • May 2006
  • June 2006
  • July 2006
  • August 2006
  • September 2006
  • October 2006
  • November 2006
  • December 2006
  • January 2007
  • February 2007
  • March 2007
  • April 2007
  • May 2007
  • June 2007
  • July 2007
  • August 2007
  • September 2007
  • October 2007
  • November 2007
  • December 2007
  • January 2008
  • February 2008
  • March 2008
  • April 2008
  • May 2008
  • June 2008
  • July 2008
  • August 2008
  • September 2008
  • October 2008
  • November 2008
  • December 2008
  • January 2009
  • February 2009
  • March 2009
  • April 2009
  • May 2009
  • June 2009
  • July 2009
  • August 2009
  • September 2009
  • October 2009
  • November 2009
  • December 2009
  • January 2010
  • February 2010
  • March 2010
  • April 2010
  • May 2010
  • June 2010
  • July 2010
  • August 2010
  • September 2010
  • October 2010
  • November 2010
  • December 2010
  • January 2011
  • February 2011
  • March 2011
  • April 2011
  • May 2011
  • June 2011
  • July 2011
  • August 2011
  • September 2011
  • October 2011
  • November 2011
  • December 2011
  • January 2012
  • February 2012
  • March 2012
  • April 2012
  • May 2012
  • June 2012
  • July 2012
  • August 2012
  • September 2012
  • October 2012
  • November 2012
  • December 2012
  • January 2013
  • February 2013
  • March 2013
  • April 2013
  • May 2013
  • June 2013
  • July 2013
  • August 2013
  • September 2013
  • October 2013
  • November 2013
  • December 2013
  • January 2014
  • February 2014
  • March 2014
  • April 2014
  • May 2014
  • June 2014
  • July 2014
  • August 2014
  • September 2014
  • October 2014
  • November 2014
  • December 2014
  • January 2015
  • February 2015
  • March 2015
  • April 2015
  • May 2015
  • June 2015
  • July 2015
  • August 2015
  • September 2015
  • October 2015
  • November 2015
  • December 2015
  • January 2016
  • February 2016
  • March 2016
  • April 2016
  • May 2016
  • June 2016
  • July 2016
  • August 2016
  • September 2016
  • October 2016
  • November 2016
  • December 2016
  • January 2017
  • February 2017
  • March 2017
  • April 2017
  • May 2017
  • June 2017
  • July 2017
  • August 2017
  • September 2017
  • October 2017
  • November 2017
  • December 2017
  • January 2018
  • February 2018
  • March 2018
  • April 2018
  • May 2018
  • June 2018
  • July 2018
  • August 2018
  • September 2018
  • October 2018
  • November 2018
  • December 2018
  • January 2019
  • February 2019
  • March 2019
  • April 2019
  • May 2019
  • June 2019
  • July 2019
  • August 2019
  • September 2019
  • October 2019
  • November 2019