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Friday, January 23, 2015

Scott In Saddle For Warner Bros.


Tall Man Riding (1955) More Of A Successful Same

Randy Scott rides for revenge, and per Code cowboy custom, finds that a bad idea (revenge themes frowned upon, then and later). There are multiple leagues of villainy enabling plenty of last reel notching to Scott's gun, action for most of time profuse. Which gal will mount the Tall Man's saddle? One is married (Dorothy Malone), the other a soiled dove in league with heavies (Peggie Castle). Randy was capable at getting jobs done sans deep-delve performance, low-key policy that plays well to present-day. A whopper fist brawl mid-way through surely had drive-inners rushing out of concession booths to catch. I imagine a Tall Man Riding among three/four similars passing summer nights to capacity parking. Was this better way to consume comfort westerns than our DVD's? The Scotts were called "S--t kickers" by J.L. Warner ... well, at least he kept them going ... there's a seeming hundred like Tall Man Riding from WB. Reliable profit was reason for outpour, these being what remnant of regular moviegoers wanted to watch. Scott was in fact a surest thing on the lot (did he drive hard enough bargains at WB and alternate address Columbia? --- I assume so). Couldn't find any of his from Burbank that lost money (Tall Man's a tall gain --- $686K in profit). Retroplex plays RS lots in HD, as have channels of western reliance, Scott among most visible of old stars thanks to sureness of his backlog to please. TCM having converted of late to true High-Def will see Technicolor (or in this case, Warnercolor) shine brighter on their westerns.

More Randolph Scott at Greenbriar Archive: Ranown Westerns, Part One and Two, Captain Kidd, Buchanan Rides Alone, The Tall T, The Nevadan, Gung Ho!, Fort Worth, The Spoilers, The Walking Hills, and Coast Guard. 

2 Comments:

Blogger Jerry E said...

Nice choice for a review. I find this one of Scott's better westerns for the Warner stable (his Scott-Browns for Columbia being superior).

And....how would you choose between Dorothy Malone and Peggie Castle??!! A man's gotta do etc....

4:22 AM  
OpenID livius1 said...

I agree with Jerry's assessment - the Columbia movies were better overall than the WB stuff. Still, the films made for Warners are mostly enjoyable and this is a good enough effort.

Colin

6:08 AM  

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