Classic movie site with rare images (no web grabs!), original ads, and behind-the-scenes photos, with informative and insightful commentary. We like to have fun with movies!
Archive and Links
grbrpix@aol.com
Search Index Here




Monday, March 16, 2015

Republic Turns Down a Dark Alley


City That Never Sleeps (1953) Back From Long Sleep

First off, this has what must be considered a definitive title for a noir thriller. I'm surprised someone hadn't used it prior to 1953 (other than for a 20's silent), or for that matter, since. Close as Republic came to "A" noir, City That Never Sleeps has a good cast, production polish, and a story in quest of something beyond cops and crime. My vote's with anyone who'll cast Chill Wills as Christ figure with a badge, his character not unlike what Ian Hunter played in 1940's Strange Cargo. City is one night in lives of intermingling desperates, Gig Young's badge accumulating tarnish as he pursues quarry barely less corrupt. William Talman represents criminal element at reluctant behest of Edward Arnold, who's got Marie Windsor for a wife, thus assurance of double-crossings and sudden death. Dialogue strives toward poetic amidst gunplay, an odd conceit memorable even when it falters. Variety was more succinct: "too wordy" and "goes overboard" being their not inapt verdict. Difference between then and now is our firmer embrace of noirs that dared to be different, and willingness to forgive missteps. The streets are Chicago, Sleep's premiere there giving the Roosevelt Theatre its best week in two years, according to trades. Skylines are nicely captured and more so for Blu-Ray delivery by Olive, whose release of City That Never Sleeps represents a first time the show has been seen for decades. Noir completists have by now dipped beaks, as should anyone who likes the offbeat among crime thrillers.

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home

grbrpix@aol.com
  • December 2005
  • January 2006
  • February 2006
  • March 2006
  • April 2006
  • May 2006
  • June 2006
  • July 2006
  • August 2006
  • September 2006
  • October 2006
  • November 2006
  • December 2006
  • January 2007
  • February 2007
  • March 2007
  • April 2007
  • May 2007
  • June 2007
  • July 2007
  • August 2007
  • September 2007
  • October 2007
  • November 2007
  • December 2007
  • January 2008
  • February 2008
  • March 2008
  • April 2008
  • May 2008
  • June 2008
  • July 2008
  • August 2008
  • September 2008
  • October 2008
  • November 2008
  • December 2008
  • January 2009
  • February 2009
  • March 2009
  • April 2009
  • May 2009
  • June 2009
  • July 2009
  • August 2009
  • September 2009
  • October 2009
  • November 2009
  • December 2009
  • January 2010
  • February 2010
  • March 2010
  • April 2010
  • May 2010
  • June 2010
  • July 2010
  • August 2010
  • September 2010
  • October 2010
  • November 2010
  • December 2010
  • January 2011
  • February 2011
  • March 2011
  • April 2011
  • May 2011
  • June 2011
  • July 2011
  • August 2011
  • September 2011
  • October 2011
  • November 2011
  • December 2011
  • January 2012
  • February 2012
  • March 2012
  • April 2012
  • May 2012
  • June 2012
  • July 2012
  • August 2012
  • September 2012
  • October 2012
  • November 2012
  • December 2012
  • January 2013
  • February 2013
  • March 2013
  • April 2013
  • May 2013
  • June 2013
  • July 2013
  • August 2013
  • September 2013
  • October 2013
  • November 2013
  • December 2013
  • January 2014
  • February 2014
  • March 2014
  • April 2014
  • May 2014
  • June 2014
  • July 2014
  • August 2014
  • September 2014
  • October 2014
  • November 2014
  • December 2014
  • January 2015
  • February 2015
  • March 2015
  • April 2015
  • May 2015
  • June 2015
  • July 2015
  • August 2015
  • September 2015
  • October 2015
  • November 2015
  • December 2015
  • January 2016
  • February 2016
  • March 2016
  • April 2016
  • May 2016
  • June 2016
  • July 2016
  • August 2016
  • September 2016